Dating subordinate employees

(You know the old saying about not, um, where you eat.) But as more Americans postpone marriage until their careers are established—and as hours get longer, with smartphones blurring work and play—it makes sense that attitudes are changing."Older generations saw work as a separate place," says Renee Cowan, Ph.Laws exist to protect employees in such situations, including Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which defines sexual harassment, and the difference between quid pro quo relationships and hostile environment harassment in the workplace.Relationships between a supervisor and his or her employee can have a negative impact on the entire organization.And women are disproportionately judged for these relationships, whether they're the boss—"With great power comes great responsibility," warns Green—or if they're the underling."Even today a boss-subordinate relationship is viewed as strategic on the woman's part," says Rebecca Chory, Ph.

There is not a specific federal regulation regarding supervisor/employee relationships, only the guidelines against sexual harassment.The laws are in place to protect both the employee as well as the employer or organization.Since employers can be held responsible in states such as California for the actions of their supervisors, there are regulations and requirements for sexual harassment training for all managers in an organization with fifty or more employees.Also, requiring all managers to complete sexual harassment training as often as deemed necessary by the company's officers is a great tool.The relationship between a supervisor and an employee may not appear to be a problem at the time of the romance, or right after, but an employee can come back and claim sexual harassment even after the relationship has ended.

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According to the EEOC, "Harassment can include 'sexual harassment' or unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical harassment of a sexual nature." The EEOC also explains that the victim can be harassed by a co-worker, an outside vendor or visitor to the workplace, or the employee's supervisor.

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